New User ? Sign Up  |  Sign In  |  Help
ask
Ask whatever question, you wish. Make sure you select the correct category for the question.
answer
Like to help other, then browse through the open questions to answer their questions.
discover
Find answer by browsing the resolved questions.
     
Search for questions :
My Profile
Categories

anonymous

Open Question Bookmark and Share

Safely regrow hallux nail after traumatic avulsion?

Please advise me about helping my big toenails regrow!

35-year-old healthy female.
Three months ago, bilateral traumatic great toenail avulsions.
Now, regrowing, but burrowing into distal nail beds.

Hot, very salty water soaks to decrease tissue swelling.
Using Japonesque-brand nippers to get under leading edge of nails, pull over tissue.
Clipping ingrowing shards.
Almost 24/7 coconut oil application (messy!)

I fear that the nails, which are regrowing strongly, will become ingrown. I have never had an ingrown nail. I have googled the problem and read about cotton bits and dental floss. The toenails are too tight for those.

Angling the tool under the nails and freeing them is painful and time-consuming but tolerable. I fear I am damaging the nail beds. I also fear I am not freeing the nails frequently enough.

Please help!

1053 day(s) ago

    Comment(s) (0)
    Report Abuse
   Find Intereseting  
   E-Mail to Friends  
   Bookmark  
   Subscribe to Answer Alert  
No comment(s) yet!     Be the first to comment
Answers (2)

anonymous
Update from the original poster:

I visited the podiatrist who helped with the traumatic avulsion at the time. She told me that one of the nails should grow in on its own, and she anticipates a good outcome.

For the other toenail:
-She used topical lidocaine
-She used sharp nail nippers to force her way under the leading edge of the nail and clipped a few shards
-There was bleeding and pain, but much relief the next day
-She wants me to manage the nail this way:
---Soak it and run sharp nippers under the leading edge every day or two
---Keep it moist with coconut oil at all times
---Come to the office right away with sings of infection (redness, pain, swelling, heat)
---Anticipate good cosmetic outcome within 6 months
---Anticipate good or excellent cosmetic outcome within 2 years

Now, my main problem is the pain and difficulty of getting an instrument under the leading edge of the nail. It's slightly curved down into the flesh, and the leading edge has a tendency to fray or break. That area is also very tender. I'm considering applying over-the-counter lidocaine beforehand. Does anyone have an opinion?

Incidentally, I have been able to return to full activities, including exercise. Ever since my podiatrist removed the shards from the nail edge, my toes are painless, except when I try to run an instrument under the nail.

Thank you!

Posted 1038 days ago

( 0 )
( 0 )
    Comment(s) (0)
   Report Abuse
No comment(s) yet! Be the first to comment on this answer


DocPod
All you can do is wait until it properly grows out and see what it is like.
Trauma like you had damages the growing area of the nail matrix and distorts the nail permanently.
You will probably need a podiatrists when the "growing out" is complete to see what the options are long term.

Posted 1050 days ago

( 0 )
( 0 )
    Comment(s) (0)
   Report Abuse
No comment(s) yet! Be the first to comment on this answer

Edit your answer. Click save, when done.
Question Title Safely regrow hallux nail after traumatic avulsion?
Your Answer
  |         |                            
bold  italic  underline  strike       big  small       superscript  subscript 
  Allows to add a link.
Caption :
Link URL :
( Must starts with "http://" )
Add  |   Cancel
  Allow to insert an image. Must be among the following file types - *.jpg, *.gif, *.png & *.bmp.
Image Url :  
( Image url must always starts with " http:// " )
Width : pixels
( Must not be greater than 450px. Enter 0px for no resize )
Add  |   Cancel
  Allow to insert YouTube video. Insert the video embed code.
Embed Code :
Add  |   Cancel
Max Allowed Characters: 5000 Current Character Count: 0
  Your comment on this question
  |         |                            
bold  italic  underline  strike       big  small       superscript  subscript 
  Allows to add a link.
Caption :
Link URL :
( Must starts with "http://" )
Add  |   Cancel
  Allow to insert an image. Must be among the following file types - *.jpg, *.gif, *.png & *.bmp.
Image Url :  
( Image url must always starts with " http:// " )
Width : pixels
( Must not be greater than 450px. Enter 0px for no resize )
Add  |   Cancel
  Allow to insert YouTube video. Insert the video embed code.
Embed Code :
Add  |   Cancel
Max Allowed Characters: 5000 Current Character Count: 0
  Your comment on this answer
  |         |                            
bold  italic  underline  strike       big  small       superscript  subscript 
  Allows to add a link.
Caption :
Link URL :
( Must starts with "http://" )
Add  |   Cancel
  Allow to insert an image. Must be among the following file types - *.jpg, *.gif, *.png & *.bmp.
Image Url :  
( Image url must always starts with " http:// " )
Width : pixels
( Must not be greater than 450px. Enter 0px for no resize )
Add  |   Cancel
  Allow to insert YouTube video. Insert the video embed code.
Embed Code :
Add  |   Cancel
Max Allowed Characters: 5000 Current Character Count: 0
Email this question link to friends
You must enter email-address, if name is entered and vice-versa for each friend.
Friend #1 -
Friend #2 -
Friend #3 -
Friend #4 -
Friend #5 -

Meet the Experts | Privacy Policy | Articles | Shop

Copyright © Podiatry Experts. All rights reserved.